Adapting GOST to the new era

After the end of World War Two, the Soviet Union took away one thing. A future war with great powers was, in their mind, inevitable. Russia had barely survived two world wars, often fighting with the lowest grade gear, sometimes even leased from other countries. From this knowledge came fear, and from this fear came paranoia. The great bear began to prepare itself for the next great war.

Most nations celebrated their diplomatic successes at the end of the second great war. Most nations prepared to rebuild. Not the Soviet Union. In a speech at the Bolshoi Theater in 19xx, Stalin celebrated Russian military industrial capacity. Their ability to produce 30,000 tanks in three years; 2,000,000 LMG’s; and over 7 billion rifle cartridges. They were preparing for a war that would never come.

Many people tend to forget there existed a weapon of mass destruction before the atom bomb: Chemical Weapons. They aren’t quite as flashy as their nuclear counterpart, and no where near as prominent as their biological brothers, but they are as cheap to produce as they are deadly. While the west may not have prepared extensively for the “poor man’s WMD,” the east certainly did.

An often forgotten fact of World War Two was its mutually destructive potential. Nearly all sides of the conflict had some form of chemical weapons, and nearly everyone had a cheaply issued gas mask. While the war did not end in sarin agents dropped from the sky, the fear was still there. A fear that would stick with the Soviet Union. Starting in 1962, the USSR would produce millions of gas masks. The GP-5, PMG, PMK, just to name a few, all rolled out of Russian factories for the general populace.

The cheap and common nature of Russian gas masks makes them a common sight among surplus collectors. Masks like the GP-5 and PMK-1 are often so common and ubiquitous, many who would would never even fall in the category of military enthusiast own then.

While Russian surplus masks are well built and effective, they have an interesting caveat. They are not threaded for 40mm NATO, instead for the 40mm GOST standard. This has caused quite a few people to produce thread adapters for these masks over the years.

Unfortunately all of these have been produced to the lowest standard possible. Often produced through FDM 3d printing, these adapter are notorious for being unable to seal. While FDM printing is a promising technology, it is not suitable for producing an airtight seal on a gas mask. This has given GOST to NATO 40mm adapters a sorry reputation.

NXG wants to change that. We are using state of the art technology to produce an air-tight, non-porous filter adapters at levels of quality far beyond the competition. With primary source documents from the Soviet Union, we have directly matched the thread patterns of the elder GOST standard. Our group is satisfied that we can produce a product that sits above the hobbyist produced adapters that exist in the market today.

40mm GOST to 40mm STANAG Filter Adapter

Designed to adapt from the 40mm GOST standard set forth by the Soviet Union to the common 40mm STANAG/NATO standard.

Construction: Solid Photoresin (Sterolithographic Curing 405nm)

Usage manual: manual.zip (2.3 MB)

Porosity Study

To ensure proper quality, NXG has done a study on the porosity of its filter adapters. We have found porosity on the product to be minimal, posing no risk.

Study Image A - Study Image B

Study Image C - Study Image D